Friday May 3

Just a reminder that your assignment , Canada’s Participation in WWII is due Monday.

You should have completed the Canada on the Homefront assignment yesterday. If not, that’s homework. I want it by Monday please.

Today you should be focusing on the Holocaust research project.

Thursday May 2

I’m in Niagara Falls today. If you were away yesterday please see the instructions on Google classroom and talk to a friend about what you missed. You need to choose a research topic for our Holocaust project.

Today though you’ll be working on an activity exploring the homefront during WWII. This is posted on Google classroom as well.

Tomorrow you’ll begin doing some research on your topic. Please follow the instructions provided about using the databases for research.

Tuesday April 30

Yesterday I asked you to record a point form response to the question: Are you proud of the way Canadians reacted to the events leading up to WWII? Explain your response by providing examples of events that make you proud or not proud.

You will be participating in a 4 corners discussion on this topic.

Then we will review the key ideas we’ve learned:

Review

  • After WWI, the world powers tried to set out a future of world peace through the formation of the League of Nations and by punishing Germany so severely that it could never cause another war.
  • The Treaty of Versailles laid the blame for WWI squarely on the shoulders of the German people, who were humiliated by the treaty’s terms.
  • As Canada was experiencing an economic crisis in the Great Depression, war clouds were gathering in Europe, where similar economic grievances made dictators seem appealing as they promised a return to glory.
  • The League of Nations proved unwilling or unable to stop the rise of aggression in Europe and the Pacific, as aggressive actions went unpunished and aggressor nations rose in power.
  • Hitler’s invasions leading up to WWII largely went unpunished and Germany proceeded to invade Austria, Czechoslovakia and Poland in quick order.
  • Canadian opinion on Hitler remained divided. Some Canadians had fascist sympathies, others warned of his evil regime. Prime Minister King visited Berlin and was impressed by Hitler and his government.
  • Despite efforts to appease Hitler and avoid war, Britain and France were forced to declare war in 1939. Canada declared war one week later.
  • Many victims of Nazi persecution, most particularly the Jewish population, tried desperately to get out of Europe. However, many Western nations, including Canada, were unwilling to accept them.

Next you will be looking at Canada’s participation in major battles in WWII. See Google Classroom for more details.

Monday April 29

Today we’ll take up the Events Leading Up to WWII assignment (it was due at the start of class so last chance to get it in).

Then we’ll have a discussion: Are you proud of the way Canadians reacted to the events leading up to WWII? Explain your response by providing examples of events that make you proud or not proud.

Review

  • After WWI, the world powers tried to set out a future of world peace through the formation of the League of Nations and by punishing Germany so severely that it could never cause another war.
  • The Treaty of Versailles laid the blame for WWI squarely on the shoulders of the German people, who were humiliated by the treaty’s terms.
  • As Canada was experiencing an economic crisis in the Great Depression, war clouds were gathering in Europe, where similar economic grievances made dictators seem appealing as they promised a return to glory.
  • The League of Nations proved unwilling or unable to stop the rise of aggression in Europe and the Pacific, as aggressive actions went unpunished and aggressor nations rose in power.
  • Hitler’s invasions leading up to WWII largely went unpunished and Germany proceeded to invade Austria, Czechoslovakia and Poland in quick order.
  • Canadian opinion on Hitler remained divided. Some Canadians had fascist sympathies, others warned of his evil regime. Prime Minister King visited Berlin and was impressed by Hitler and his government.
  • Despite efforts to appease Hitler and avoid war, Britain and France were forced to declare war in 1939. Canada declared war one week later.
  • Many victims of Nazi persecution, most particularly the Jewish population, tried desperately to get out of Europe. However, many Western nations, including Canada, were unwilling to accept them.

If we have time left we’ll be moving on to the next assignment:

Wednesday April 24

Was WWII an inevitable consequence of the very plans put in place to try to prevent another war? Today you’re going to learn about the Treaty of Versailles and The League of Nations and try to answer that question.

As we go through this presentation, you are going to take notes. There are a few different options available for you. You choose the one you think will work best for you. I will have paper copies of the graphic organizers available as well as digital copies posted on Google Classroom. Whichever note you choose, you will hand it in to me along with your answer to the above question.

Was WWII an inevitable consequence of the very plans put in place to try to prevent another war? At the bottom of your note, answer this question and provide at least three supporting details.

Tuesday April 23

We’ll begin today by taking up the Consequences of The Great Depression graphic organizer. Please add to your notes.

Then it seems like some of you struggled with what to base your paragraphs on Bennett’s New Deal on so I’ll walk you through that. If you need to revise your paragraph and resubmit, you can do that.

Please also double check that you’ve submitted your infographic on the causes of the Great Depression.

Monday April 15

Your Causes of the Great Depression infographic is due today.

We will be turning our attention to the impact of the Great Depression on Canadians by watching a documentary. You will have a graphic organizer to fill out as you watch. You can either do this by hand or by filling out the digital version in Google Classroom.